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Roger Kautz Prize

  • November 30, 2011 - Victoria Ronga, analytical chemistry student, poses in front of a Bruker 700 MHz NMR spectrometer in t...
    November 30, 2011 - Victoria Ronga, analytical chemistry student, poses in front of a Bruker 700 MHz NMR spectrometer in the NMR Lab Center for Drug Discovery at Northeastern University. Ronga recently returned coop in Crete, Greece where she analyzed organic materials with the same type of spectometer. PHOTO: Mary Knox Merrill / Northeastern University
    Northeastern University

Established in memory of Dr. Roger Kautz, a passionate researcher and teacher of NMR spectroscopy techniques and an active member of the Chemistry Department and Barnett Institute communities. He was a regular attendee at seminars, meetings and other activities, demonstrating his appetite for new knowledge, support of colleagues and students, and passion for science.

Dr. Kautz made significant contributions to teaching undergraduate students about NMR spectroscopy, even going so far as to create instructional materials and qualification tests so that student could gain access to the 400 MHz instrument for both course work and senior research projects. Dr. Kautz never merely give an answer, he taught students to understand what they were doing with the instrument, and how it worked, so they could help themselves in the future.

The Roger Kautz Prize will be awarded to an undergraduate student who demonstrates talent, expertise, and, indeed, passion for NMR spectroscopy and provide funding to attend a scientific conference.

  • November 30, 2011 - Victoria Ronga, analytical chemistry student, poses in front of a Bruker 700 MHz NMR spectrometer in t...
    November 30, 2011 - Victoria Ronga, analytical chemistry student, poses in front of a Bruker 700 MHz NMR spectrometer in the NMR Lab Center for Drug Discovery at Northeastern University. Ronga recently returned coop in Crete, Greece where she analyzed organic materials with the same type of spectometer. PHOTO: Mary Knox Merrill / Northeastern University
    Northeastern University